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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
clinton's first campaign ad? i hope so. it's just another manic monday. it's "the cycle." >> i'm glad to see america's favorite nerd is back at the table. welcome, steve. i hope you feel better. >> that's nice about you. >> i wasn't talking about myself. 1823, silent films star harold lloyd gave us a thrilling moment in american history. here it is. ♪ >> there was no computer generated special effects back then. that was a literal cliff-hanger, and 90 years later it keeps you on the edge of your seat. the literal cliff-hanger is what we have in congress right now. there's little to no doubt we'll avoid doomsday, but for a while we hang over the aabyss in a daredevil stunt of our own making. this makes americans believe congress is a bunch of big, fat liars. when it comes to honesty, congress ranked so low they're second to used car salesmen. it's a fee even harold lloyd wouldn't attempt to pull off in exchange for an over climactic conclusion. today we debay tut the wheel of fortune style. we use it to determine how to refer to the debate. cliff, slope, fiesta or follies. today we g
there in washington when the clinton rates that we're all talking about now went into effect back in 1993. you probably remember the republicans saying there would be a second recession and millions of jobs lost and none of of that happened in the 1990s. now we're back at the point where democrats for a decade have fought the lower rates and saying we need clinton rates. if it's going to happen, this is sort of the moment. the news at least today right now in terms of where these negotiations have gone is republicans seem to be putting out the word that the potential framework for compromise on this is 37%. instead of going up to 39.6, which was the top rate that clinton set, it's down to 35 now. they move to 37, and republicans are a critical number of republicans in the house are able to say, well we didn't give if all the way. we got the best deal we could and held them to 37%. from the democrats' standpoint after fighting it for a decade, do you think it's good enough to get to 37%? >> normally that's where a compromise is. whenever you legislate numbers and tax rates are always just the l
in the clinton era a reasonable rate is just a reasonable thing to do. it's not outrageous. really defaulting on the fact that tax rates have to go down, ultimately it falls on deaf ears. nobody likes to pay taxes, but we got to close the gap somehow. >> sure. could not agree with you more on that last point. if he we go back to the sort of origins of the self-inflicted fiscal whatever it is, you know, this all came out basically of the debt ceiling crisis of 2011 where republicans said, we are not going to do what we've done repeatedly for the past 30 years and just automatically raise the debt ceiling. we're going to hold the country hostage over that. one thing we keep hearing over and over is markets and businesses hate uncertainty. bruce bar let put this debt limit debate into context better than i could today. he wrote the debt limit is nuts and serves no useful purpose to allow members of congress to vote for vast cuts in taxation and increases in spending and telling the truzary it's not permitted to sell bonds to cover the deficits that congress created. to my knowledge no other nati
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)